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November 2019 Land Science Newsletter

Managing Principal for ATON Langan Discusses Environmental Strategies for Protecting Assets

For Ron Carroll, owner and Managing Principal of ATON LLC, choosing a career in environmental remediation was both a personal and professional choice. That’s because when he was younger, Mr. Carroll lived near and had friends who were impacted by the Times Beach dioxin cleanup project in the St. Louis area. As a result of toxic chemicals being mixed with oil and applied to roads for dust control, a massive cleanup was initiated in St. Louis County. Consequently, the EPA ended up buying many of the homes within the town to facilitate an effective cleanup in the area. Understandably, this environmental hazard and subsequent remediation project left an indelible impression on Mr. Carroll. Learn more in our client spotlight.

 

Managing Principal for ATON Langan Discusses Environmental Strategies for Protecting Assets

7 Reasons to Hire a Land Science Certified Applicator

7 Reasons to Hire a Land Science Certified Applicator

The effectiveness of a vapor intrusion mitigation (VIM) system depends on the quality of its installation. Improper installation can lead to vapors entering occupied spaces, potentially harming human health, and exposing the owners to legal liability. In order to minimize the possibility of system failure, it is highly advisable to hire an applicator who has undergone a rigorous certification process demonstrating they can meet strict manufacturer installation standards. Hiring an applicator who has not been certified can lead to substandard installation, system failure, and increased risk to human health. Download the ebook to learn more.

 

7 Reasons to Hire a Land Science Certified Applicator

 


5 Reasons to Consider a Preemptive Vapor Barrier to Protect Your Property Investment

5 Reasons to Consider a Preemptive Vapor Barrier to Protect Your Property Investment
Historically, easily-punctured thin-mil plastic sheets or inflexible and difficult-to-seal High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) Barriers were the only option for vapor mitigation at large warehouses or sites where regulatory requirements were not a driving risk factor. These solutions offered either chemical resistance or constructability, but not both. Composed of an innovative, metallized-film, MonoShield sets the standard for preventing diffusion and permeation of chemical vapors. Its nitrile-based asphalt latex ensures a seal far more effective and easier to apply than tape-based or heat-welded systems. Download the ebook to learn more.

5 Reasons to Consider a Preemptive Vapor Barrier to Protect Your Property Investment

 


MonoShield Vapor Barrier Installed at Former Hazel Park Raceway Speeds Up Redevelopment

 MonoShield Vapor Barrier Installed at Former Hazel Park Raceway Speeds Up Redevelopment

The former Hazel Park Raceway was located in a designated Opportunity Zone, which was established by the US Federal Treasury to encourage businesses to invest in blighted properties by providing tax incentives. Hazel Park welcomed the economic development and the promise of future jobs coming to the community through this key redevelopment project. With MonoShield offering a more reliable, cost-effective solution, the project was assured of meeting milestones and staying on time and on budget.

 MonoShield Vapor Barrier Installed at Former Hazel Park Raceway Speeds Up Redevelopment

 


Download Brochure: MonoShield Reinforced Aluminum Vapor Barrier

 Download Brochure: MonoShield Reinforced Aluminum Vapor Barrier
 MonoShield is a chemically resistant and easy-to-apply barrier specifically designed as a preemptive solution for vapor intrusion at brownfield redevelopment sites. It is backed by unparalleled design support, robust warranty options, and a network of certified applicators who can ensure quality installation. Download the brochure to learn more about MonoShield.
 Download Brochure: MonoShield Reinforced Aluminum Vapor Barrier

 

Tip 9 To Maximize Your Investment With Opportunity Zones
Retro-Coat can be used in situations where structures cannot be torn down. This chemically resistant coating can allow property owners to protect their tenants and investment with little down time. Applying Retro-Coat can provide a building owner with long-term assurance that the vapor intrusion risk has been successfully mitigated, while at the same time, reducing the overall mitigation cost and avoiding the need to alter the building’s foundation. To learn more about our other Opportunity Zones tips, download the eBook.
Tip 9 To Maximize Your Investment With Opportunity Zones

Upcoming Events

NGWA Groundwater Week

12/3 – 12/5/2019, Las Vegas, NV
Visit conference website

A&WMA 2020 Annual Seminar

1/23/2020, Buffalfo, NY
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SAME Small Business Day

2/6/2020, Waltham, MA
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Alaska Forum on the Environment

2/10 – 2/14/2020, Alaska, AK
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Emerging Contaminants Summit

3/10 – 3/11/2020, Westminster, CO
Visit conference website

30th Annual International Conference on Soils, Water, Energy, and Air

3/16 – 3/19/2020, San Diego, CA
Visit conference website

Questions?

REGENESIS has remediation experts based worldwide to assist you in your brownfield site cleanup. As the technology leader in advanced bioremediation solutions, we can help ensure success on your next remediation project. Use the map on our website to find your regional REGENESIS contact today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inspector Training Program

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Inspector Training Program

General Information

Inspector Training Manual

This manual is intended to provide guidance in how to properly inspect the Land Science’s vapor barrier membranes. Due to varying job site conditions and a range of construction methods some conditions are not covered in this manual. Please contact Land Science® to clarify any job specific questions.

Inspector Certification

By becoming a Land Science certified inspector, you are agreeing to certify that the Land Science vapor barrier membrane systems  will be installed per the project specification and the standards set forth by Land Science.

Inspection Process

A Land Science certified inspector is expected to verify that the installation of the vapor barrier system was done in accordance with the inspection protocol in this manual and the product specifications developed by Land Science.

Frequency of Inspections

Several factors will determine the frequency of inspections. State or local regulations supersede Land Science requirements provided at a minimum the Land Science quality control procedures found in this manual have been met. The minimum requirements include verifying the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE thickness and observing a smoke test to verify the system integrity.

It is the responsibility of the Land Science certified applicator to coordinate with the Land Science certified inspector as to the time of the inspection. To ensure the installation and inspection runs smoothly, the applicator should consult the inspector prior to starting work on the site to coordinate schedules and time allowances.

Questions? Please contact Land Science. Telephone: (949)481-8118

 

Items Needed for Inspection

(1) mil reading caliper (1 mil = 0.001″)

(1) wet mil thickness gauge (Optional)

(1) needle nose depth gauge (For concrete surface applications only)

Minimum of (1) repair indicator (florescent spray paint, chalk marker, etc.)

(1) plastic bag or butcher paper to collect and hold coupon samples

Hard hat as required by general contractor

Protective eyewear as required by general contractor

Steel-toed boots as required by general contractor

Digital Camera

Land Science Inspector Training Manual

 

Take the quiz here

Inspection times and frequency should be agreed upon between the Land Science vapor barrier contractor and Land Science certified inspector prior to beginning membrane installation.

  1. True
  2. False

One mil is equal to the following equivalent in inches:

  1. .1″
  2. .01″
  3. .001″
  4. .0001″

When inspecting the membrane, what is the minimum Land Science requirement?:

  1. A smoke test
  2. Coupon sampling
  3. The quality assurance requirements of the local regulatory agency
  4. All of the above
  5. Both A & B

Weather Conditions

Application in Cold Temperatures

The application of Land Science’s vapor barriers in colder temperatures is done on a case by case basis and subject to the applicator’s discretion. The applicator should determine if the application conditions will adversely affect the quality of the vapor barrier installation.

FROST is the biggest threat to a successful vapor barrier application. Do NOT apply the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE material over FROST.

The ideal temperature to install a vapor barrier NITRA-CORE is 45°F or higher. Application of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE in temperatures between 25°F and 45°F can be accomplished by heating the vapor barrier’s NITRA-CORE layer prior to application. The heating of the vapor barrier’s NITRA-CORE can be done using a variety of different methods, contact Land Science for the approved methods.

Keeping the temperature of the vapor barrier’s NITRA-CORE material and the catalyst above freezing is imperative; failure to do so will result in the material freezing. If the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE material freezes, it must be replaced. Coldmark indicators are placed on the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE when ambient air temperatures might cause the material to freeze during shipment. For more information on how to use the Coldmark indicators refer to the Material Handling section in this manual.

Temperatures under 25°F require additional measures for application. If heat will be circulated through the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE material, ensure the ambient air temperature is increased to >35°F. If heat will not be circulated through the material, artificially raise the ambient air temperature to 45°F.

In addition to maintaining the temperature of the material, the temperature of the substrate may need to be heated to ensure proper adhesion. Heating of the substrate can be done by using a torch or by tenting the area and heating it artificially. Permission from the general contractor and concrete contractor should be obtained by the applicator to artificially heat the concrete, or other substrates, as artificial heat may be detrimental to some substrates.

Application in Hot Temperatures

Vapor barrier applications are not restricted by warm temperatures. One advantage to applying vapor barrier NITRA-COREs in hot weather (substrate temperature over 105°F), is that the NITRA-CORE will cure very quickly. However, it will become very tacky and susceptible to damage by foot traffic. Inspections should be done in the early morning or late afternoon in order to minimize foot traffic on the NITRA-CORE membrane.

When applied in hot temperatures, the protective BOND layer should be placed over the spray applied NITRA-CORE layer immediately after the wet mil thickness of the NITRA-CORE layer has been verified and smoke tested.

Application in Wind

Wind over 10 miles per hour can present a problem when applying vapor barriers.

  • Applicators need to use their own judgment when applying Land Science’s vapor barriers in windy conditions.
  • Material can be lost due to the wind blowing the vapor barrier’s NITRA-CORE away before it reaches the surface. This can potentially damage areas several hundred feet away from the intended application surface.
  • The applicator is responsible to mask off any areas on the job site where overspray can present a problem.
  • Overspray can be combated by selecting one member of the spray crew to stand in front of the sprayer with a large piece of plywood, or other similar material.
  • The vapor barrier BASE or BOND sheet layers should be secured using sand bags or other methods to prevent the sheets from blowing away.

Application in Rain

A light mist or even drizzle is acceptable, provided water is not ponding on the surface that the NITRA-CORE will be applied to. Spraying should be suspended if rain intensity increases. When the rain stops, ponding water must be removed before spraying can continue. Even though ponding water has been removed, some moisture can remain. If moisture does remain, it is possible the membrane will not adhere immediately to the BASE layer; this is normal and the NITRA-CORE should fully adhere as the membrane begins to cure.

Substrate Requirements

Concrete Surfaces

In general, only apply the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE material to dry, clean and uniform substrates. Concrete surfaces must be a light trowel, light broom or equivalent finish. Remove fins, ridges and other projections and fill honeycomb, aggregate pockets, grout joints and tie holes, and other voids with hydraulic cement or rapid-set grout. It is the applicator’s responsibility to point out unacceptable substrate conditions to the general contractor and ensure the proper repairs are made.

Vapor barrier NITRA-CORE or NITRA-CORE Detail should not be applied over standing water as the material will not adhere to the desired substrate.

Applying the vapor barrier spray membrane to a damp concrete surface is acceptable. Check to ensure that proper adhesion has occurred after the material has been sprayed and set up on the surface for a minimum of a few hours.

The applicator should ensure that a clean surface is maintained when the NITRA-CORE is applied to concrete or sheet components. Excess dirt and dust on concrete surfaces and dirty pipe penetrations may prevent the NITRA-CORE from adhering properly.

Forming oils, concrete curing agents, dirt accumulation, and other debris must be removed prior to application of the NITRA-CORE layer.

Conduit Penetrations

A clean surface should be maintained when applying the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE or vapor barrier NITRA-CORE Detail to pipe penetrations or around conduits. It is recommended to remove excess dirt and dust from pipe penetrations prior to application. Slick finishes, like those found on steel or plastic pipes might need to be given a profile by using an emery cloth or sand paper.

Substrate Preparation

Earth, sand or gravel substrate should be prepared and compacted to general building code requirements.

If installing over native soils, pieces of debris, gravel and/or any other material that can potentially puncture the vapor barrier’s BASE layer need to be removed.

A sand substrate will require no additional preparation.

The type of gravel layer being used under the vapor barrier system needs to be confirmed and verified with the applicator and Land Science. The gravel layer must be compacted and rolled flat. Ideally a ¾” minus gravel layer with no more than one fractured face should be specified; however, the vapor barrier system can accommodate to a wide variety of different substrates. Contact Land Science if there are questions regarding the compatibility of the vapor barrier and the utilized substrate.

The use of pea gravel will eliminate the concern of any jagged edges puncturing the membrane, however its often not compacted properly and as a result pea gravel can be an unstable substrate that is detrimental to the system.

Green Concrete

Applying the vapor barrier’s NITRA-CORE to “green” concrete is acceptable and can be advantageous in creating a superior bond to the concrete surface. To help reduce blistering, apply a primer coat of only the asphalt component of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE spray. Some blistering of the membrane will occur and may be more severe on walls exposed to direct sunlight. Blistering is normal and will subside over time. Using a needle nose depth gauge, confirm that the specified mil thickness has been applied.

As the concrete cures and the moisture extracts from the concrete, the curing concrete draws the membrane into the pores of the concrete surface. This process will create a bond to concrete that will be stronger than spraying directly to fully cured concrete.

 

Take the quiz here

Applying the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE in hot temperatures can present the following challenges:

  1. The membrane will not cure properly
  2. The membrane can melt
  3. Foot traffic can be detrimental if the membrane becomes extremely tacky
  4. There are no challenges to installing NITRA-CORE in warm weather

When applying the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE in cold temperatures it is ok to install the NITRA-CORE material over frost.

  1. True
  2. False

It is acceptable to apply the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE to a concrete surface with exposed aggregate pockets

  1. True
  2. False
  3. True, but the exposed aggregate pockets need to be filled in with hydraulic cement or rapid-set grout

When applying the vapor barrier Nitra-Core material, the following items need to be removed from the concrete surface

  1. Forming oils
  2. Dirt
  3. Curing agents
  4. None of the above
  5. All of the above

What is the lowest temperature the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE can be applied?

  1. 45 Degrees
  2. 25 Degrees
  3. 25 Degrees but with only if properly equipped
  4. 5 Degrees but with only if properly equipped

When applying the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE in poor weather conditions the applicator should:

  1. Not install NITRA-CORE
  2. Use their best judgment
  3. Work to meet the schedule of the general contractor
  4. Spray the NITRA-CORE, there are no weather limitations

Installation Instructions

BASE Installation and Seam Overlaps

A depiction of this process can be found in Appendix A.

The vapor barrier’s BASE layer will be overlapped a minimum of 6″ prior to the application of the NITRA-CORE layer.

The applicator will roll out the BASE layer across the subgrade and overlap the sheets by 6″. The geotextile side (fabric side) should be facing down, with the textured HDPE layer facing up. 60 mils will be applied in the seam overlap and then the two BASE layers will be pressed together to complete the seam.

Visually verify there are no gaps/fish-mouths in seams or reinforcement fabric used in details.

NOTE: In windy conditions it might be necessary to encapsulate the seam by spraying the NITRA-CORE layer over the completed BASE seam.

NOTE: If the BASE layer is left out overnight and not sprayed, moisture may collect on the BASE layer. Moisture must be removed by using a broom, squeegee, leaf blower, or other method. A small amount of moisture might remain on the BASE, even if the standing water should be removed. The effect of the trapped moisture is detailed in the section below.

Spraying of the NITRA-CORE Material

It is necessary to ensure the proper mil thickness after applying the spray applied NITRA-CORE layer. Several approaches can be used; however, use the following options as guidance in observing the application of the NITRA-CORE layer. Depending on the spray set up used, the following approaches can be used:

  • Build up the required mil thickness in one slow pass.
  • Take several quick passes to build up the required mil thickness.
  • An efficient blend of the two methods is to build up the membrane to the specified thickness using roughly 6 passes and then begin to build up 30 mils by making 3 passes (each pass is approximately 10 mils) with ½ of the fan pattern. Continue to overlap ½ of the fan pattern with each 30 mill build up, in effect overlapping 2, 30 mil layers.

NOTE: Repairs and detailing may be done over the NITRA-CORE layer prior to the original layer of the NITRA-CORE being fully cured. However, standing water produced as a result of the NITRA-CORE curing should be removed prior to a new application of NITRA-CORE.

If the vapor barrier BASE has a small amount of moisture as a result of rain or being left out overnight, standing water needs to be removed. After the standing water is removed, a small amount of moisture may remain on the BASE layer. The result is a thin film of moisture that will delay the bonding of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE to the BASE. Full bonding will occur between the BASE and NITRA-CORE in a few hours depending on the ambient conditions.

The vapor barrier NITRA-CORE layer will shrink as it cures. Observed shrinkage ranges between 5% and 10% (5% for vertical surfaces and 10% for horizontal surfaces). When taking wet mil measurements, readings should indicate 63 (5%) mils for a vertical surface, and 66 mils (10%) for a horizontal surface, in order to yield a 60-mil cured membrane. After the verification of mil thicknesses is complete mark the area for repair. For more detail on the quality control procedures, refer to the “Vapor Barrier Quality Control” section.

When the membrane application is complete, review the membrane for any missed or lightly sprayed areas and mark them for repair. If any thin areas are found, they can be quickly repaired using the vapor barrier’s NITRA-CORE Detail or the spray applied NITRA-CORE material.

The membrane will cure in 24 to 48 hours. As a rule, when temperature decreases or humidity increases, the curing of the membrane will be prolonged. The vapor barrier can be smoke tested, tested for thickness, repaired (if necessary) and covered with the BOND layer before the NITRA-CORE is fully cured. Please refer to the Vapor Barrier Quality Control section of this document for mil thickness measurement procedures.

NOTE: The NITRA-CORE spray is a water-based emulsion and heightened awareness should be taken when spraying in cooler temperatures. Refer to the section in the manual titled “Weather Conditions” for specific guidance.

BOND Layer Installation

After the installation of 60 mils of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE layer is complete, the NITRA-CORE thickness has been verified, a smoke test has been conducted and repairs have been made, install the final vapor barrier BOND protective layer.

The BOND layer will be rolled out perpendicular to the vapor barrier BASE layer. The seams of the BOND layer will be overlapped a minimum of 6″and then secured using 60 mils of NITRA-CORE along the top of the seam.

NOTE: In instances of windy conditions or if the vapor barrier is to be used in waterproofing situations, 60 mils of NITRA-CORE should be sprayed in the overlap of the vapor barrier BOND as is done in the installation of the BASE layer. A 30 mil bead of NITRA-CORE will also be sprayed to secure the BOND at all termination points.

Vapor Barrier Repair Procedure

The detailed repair procedures used by the certified applicators, along with a detailed depiction of how to repair punctures to the vapor barrier system can be found in Appendix B.

 

Take the quiz here

The membrane will take longer to cure if:

  1. Temperatures increase
  2. Humidity decreases
  3. Temperatures decrease
  4. A & B
  5. B & C

The geotextile side of the vapor barrier BASE layer should be facing:

  1. Up
  2. Down

If the vapor barrier BASE layer is left out overnight and moisture collects on the membrane, the following actions should be taken:

  1. Remove and replace the BASE layer
  2. Sweep or squeegee off all standing water
  3. Spray 60 mils of NITRA-CORE over the standing water

Membrane Terminations

A depiction of this process can be found in Appendix C.

Ensure the surface the membrane is being terminated to be prepared in accordance with the “Substrate Requirement” section in this manual. Concrete surfaces that are not a light trowel, light broom or equivalent finish, will need to be repaired.

A standard termination technique is appropriate for terminating the membrane onto exterior footings, pile caps, interior footings and grade beams. When terminating the membrane onto stem walls, terminate the membrane 6″ onto the vertical surface. Approximately, 3″ of slack should be left in the vapor barrier BASE at the edge to the termination surface.

Terminations on horizontal and vertical surfaces should extend 6″ onto the termination surface. Job specific conditions may prevent a 6″ termination. In these conditions, contact Land Science for recommendations. If less than 1″ of termination surface is available, then additional concrete may need to be poured or a termination bar may need to be used to achieve the proper termination requirements.

When terminating to a stem wall, the slab thickness may be less than the 6″. If this is the case, the slab is thinner than the required tie in (6″) for the membrane. It will be necessary to remove aggregate in order to obtain the proper termination without extending the membrane beyond the top of the slab.

NOTE: Reinforcement fabric may be used to provide additional strength to terminations but is not required.

Sealing Penetrations

A depiction of this process can be found in Appendix D.

NOTE: All pipe penetrations should be securely in place prior to the installation of the vapor barrier system. Any loose penetrations should be secured prior to the vapor barrier application, as loose penetrations could potentially exert pressure on the membrane and damage the membrane after installation.

The vapor barrier BASE layer should fit snug around the penetrations and the gap between the BASE layer and penetration should not be more than a 1/8″.

A cable tie will be placed around the finished penetration. The cable tie should be snug, but not overly tight as to slice into the finished seal.

NOTE: Metal or other slick penetration surfaces may require treatment in order to achieve proper adhesion. For plastic pipes, sand paper may be used to achieve a profile, while an emery cloth is more appropriate for metal surfaces. An emery cloth should also be used to remove any rust on metal surfaces.

OPTION: The cable tie may be placed after the reinforcement fabric and before the second 30 mil layer of NITRA-CORE is applied.

Pile Penetrations

The seal developed around a pile will be created in the same manner as a pipe penetration. Additional questions about how to properly seal onto or around a pile should be directed to Land Science.

Penetration Clusters

To maximize the seal around penetrations, Land Science recommends that a minimum of 3″ spacing be placed between penetrations. However, in some cases several penetrations will be clustered together tightly and will make it very difficult to seal the penetrations properly. NOTE: Land Science provides these options as a recommendation to the specifying engineer,but does not warrant products not supplied by Land Science.

Option 1

Pour unreinforced concrete in between and extending 6″ around the penetration cluster. Seal the vapor barrier system to the 6″ collar using the standard termination method. Then apply a solvent free sealant around the penetration cluster and allow curing.

Option 2

Use 1 larger diameter pipe to incase all the smaller diameter pipes. Seal the membrane to the larger diameter pipe per the standard penetration detail. Then fill the annular space inside the large diameter pipe with a non-shrink solvent free caulking material.

Vertical Below Grade Walls

NOTE: If hydrostatic pressure is present contact Land Science for the project specific recommendations. In hydrostatic conditions the vapor barrier membrane will run under the entire foundation slab and up the vertical walls. The membrane will terminate 1′ above the design watertable specified in the published soils report and vapor barrier Waterstop-HDL will also be required at all cold joints. The inspector should sign off that the placement of the water stop was per specification.

Free Standing Walls

On vertical walls, form tie holes need to be grouted.

Grouted form tie holes and repaired concrete surfaces should be prepped by coating the repaired surface with the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE Detail. A 30-mil coat of NITRA-CORE Detail will be applied to these areas.

Form joints in concrete should be reinforced using the vapor barrier’s NITRA-CORE Detail and reinforcement fabric. Apply a coat NITRA-CORE Detail 3″ on each side of the form joint. Then embed the reinforcement fabric and apply another layer of NITRA-CORE Detail making sure to fully encase the reinforcement fabric with the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE material. Once complete, 60 mils of NITRA-CORE will be applied to the wall and over the form joint.

Shoring Systems

Due to the use of many different types of shoring systems contact Land Science if applying Land Science vapor barriers to shoring walls. Building code and project conditions will determine the configuration of the vapor barrier system.

 

Take the quiz here

Reinforcement fabric is used to ensure a tight seal is maintained around penetrations as the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE cures

  1. True
  2. False

A 6″ termination of the vapor barrier membrane is required, a less than 6″ termination is acceptable provided it is cleared with Land Science.

  1. True
  2. False

The vapor barrier BASE should fit snug around each penetration, the maximum allowable distance between the penetration and the BASE layer is:

  1. 1/8″
  2. 3/8″
  3. 1/2″
  4. 3/4″

Damage to the membrane around pipe penetrations is likely due to:

  1. The penetration not being properly secured
  2. The pouring of concrete
  3. The use of a laser screed
  4. All of the above

Material Handling

Arrival of Material

ColdMark indicators are placed on emulsion materials when shipped. Clear indicates the material is OK, purple indicates the material has been exposed to below freezing temperatures and should be replaced. The applicator is responsible for checking the ColdMark indicators before accepting shipment, if the indicator is purple refuse delivery and contact Land Science immediately to arrange delivery of replacement material.

Storage

Materials will bear the manufacturer’s name, product brand name, date of manufacture, and directions for storing and mixing with other components.

Materials will be stored in a clean, dry, protected location and above 38°F as required by the manufacturer. Protect stored materials from direct sunlight. Do NOT allow the material to freeze. If temperatures are expected to fall within the range of 32°F steps should be taken to elevate ambient air temperature of the storage area above the possibility of freezing. If the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE emulsion does freeze, it must be replaced.

The Land Science certified applicator is responsible for verifying the material did not freeze during transit and that material does not freeze when stored on site. However, it would be prudent for the inspector to also check the coldmark indicators to verify the material did not freeze while on site.

In colder climates, storage of material in temperature-controlled areas is preferred. Alternatives can include: space heaters, tenting storage area, and others. The method chosen should be verified and maintained.

Material that exceeds the stated shelf life should be removed from the jobsite and disposed of using the proper legal methods.

Spill and Disposal Procedures

Contain spillages with sand or earth and remove by normal methods. Dispose of according to state and local regulations. If the NITRA-CORE enters a water course or sewer, advise the respective water authority. The un-cured and cured material is non-toxic and non-flammable and can be disposed of in landfills.

Safety

Both the vapor barrier BASE and the vapor barrier BOND layers are 12′ x 150′ and each roll weighs approximately 104 pounds. Care should be taken in lifting and transporting the rolls around the jobsite.

The NITRA-CORE layer is a water-based co-polymer asphaltic emulsion. The material is non-toxic, but that does not mean one should be careless when handling the material.

  • Avoid contact with eyes
  • Avoid inhalation
  • Avoid ingestion

Frequent or prolonged exposure of the NITRA-CORE layer may cause skin irritation. The following actions are recommended:

  • Protective Equipment: Use of clothing, gloves, and/or barrier cream is recommended for skin protection.
  • Respiratory Protection: Inhalation should be avoided but is not considered to be hazardous.
  • Ventilation: Use local exhaust ventilation when applying in a confined area.

Emergency and First Aid Procedures

For ingestion: DO NOT induce vomiting. Keep at rest and get prompt medical attention. For eye contamination: Irrigate eyes with water. For skin contact: Wash affected areas of the body with hand cleaner, and then use soap and water.

Contact a physician as needed for any of the above occurrences.

 

Take the quiz here

In storage, the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE material is not temperature sensitive.

  1. True
  2. False

If a material spill occurs:

  1. Dispose of the material by pouring it in the nearest water source
  2. Use sand or earth to help contain the asphalt emulsion
  3. Check with the local authorities about proper disposal
  4. B and C
  5. All of the above

Quality Control

Certified Applicator

Authorized installation of Land Science vapor barriers can only be accomplished by one of Land Science Certified Applicators.

Membrane Inspections

For projects that will require a material or system (workmanship and material) warranty, Land Science will require a manufacturer’s representative or certified 3rd party inspector to inspect and verify that the membrane has been installed per the manufacturer’s recommendations.

The Land Science certified applicator is responsible for contacting the Land Science certified inspector for inspection. Prior to application of the membrane, a notice period for inspection should be agreed upon between the applicator and inspector.

Material Yield

Material yield is one of the first indicators in determining if the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE layer has been installed correctly. A baseline standard for yield is as follows:

 

Material Container        60 dry mils        80 dry mils        100 dry mils

55 Gallon Drum                    935 ft2          660 ft2                550 ft2

275 Gallon Tote                    4,675 ft2       3,300 ft2           2,750 ft2

330 Gallon Tote                    5,610 ft2       3,960 ft2           3,300 ft2

 

The estimated yield is 17 ft2 per gallon for a 60 dry mil application using the recommended thickness, unless otherwise noted by a specified engineer or regulatory agency.

Yields can decrease based on the complexity of the foundation. Projects containing many penetrations and areas where a lot of detailing is required might reduce the material yield to 16 ft2 or 15 ft2 per gallon for a 60-mil membrane.

Millage Verification

The measurement tools listed below will help verify the thickness of the NITRA-CORE layer. As measurement verification experience is gained, these tools will help confirm thickness measurements that can be obtained by pressing one’s fingers into the NITRA-CORE membrane.

To verify the mil thickness of the NITRA-CORE, the following measurement devices are available:

Mil reading caliper (required): Calipers are used to measure the thickness of coupon samples. To measure coupon samples correctly, the thickness of the vapor barrier sheet layers must be taken into account (This is best done by obtaining a sample of the BASE layer and then zeroing out the caliper to the BASE layer). Mark sample area for repair.

Wet mil thickness gauge (optional): A wet mil thickness gauge may be used to quickly measure the mil thickness of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE layer. The thickness of the sheet layers do not factor into the mil thickness reading, but the softness of the subgrade might result in inaccurate readings.

NOTE: When first using a wet mil thickness gauge on a project, collect coupon samples to verify the wet mil gauge thickness readings.

Needle nose digital depth gauge (for concrete only): A needle nose depth gauge can be used when measuring the NITRA-CORE thickness on vertical walls or in field measurements. Mark measurement area for repair.

To obtain a proper wet mil thickness reading, consider the 5 to 10 percent shrinkage that will occur as the membrane fully cures. Not considering the thickness of the sheet layers, a freshly sprayed membrane should have a minimum wet thickness of 63 (5%) to 66 (10%) mils.

Visual Inspections

The guidelines outlined in this section provide ways to quantify and observe the proper installation of the vapor barrier system. However, a visual inspection should also be done to ensure any visual imperfections are not present, i.e. fish-mouths, punctures, voids, etc. During a visual inspection post installation, punctures in the system should be easy to identify due to the color contrasting layers of the system.

Membrane Testing Log

To aid in the inspection process and properly document the membrane inspection, create a membrane testing log. We recommend creating the log by using the foundation plan (plan view) of the structure and then creating a 500 square foot grid over the foundation. If this is not able to be done, enclosed is a membrane testing log template that can also be used. (Appendix E)

Wet Mil Thickness Readings

A wet mil thickness gauge is one method to verify the mil thickness of the NITRA-CORE layer. An advantage to this method is the ability to verify the NITRA-CORE thickness by minimizing destructive coupon sampling.

  1. Create a membrane testing log by obtaining a copy of the foundation plan and then draw a 500 square foot grid over the foundation plan. Make two copies of the membrane testing log; one should be used when collecting coupon samples and the other should be used when conducting the smoke test.
  2. Note time, date, project name, inspector name, temperature and weather conditions on testing log.
  3. Number each quadrant and inspect sequentially.
  4. When arriving at each quadrant quickly assess if there are any conditions that might present any challenges in establishing a proper seal. Note areas and discuss with applicator.
  5. Conduct a visual inspection of the membrane. Look for areas where a proper seal was not created, i.e. a fish-mouth at the termination and areas where the membrane might be sprayed thin. Mark areas needed for repair in the field with florescent paint or with chalk. Also make a note on the testing log.
  6. Conduct a thickness sample in the area that is suspected to be sprayed thin and take three readings within 3″ of one another. When beginning a project, verify the wet mil gauge thickness reading by cutting a coupon sample and measuring the thickness with a caliper. Once wet mil thickness readings have been confirmed and established, confirm wet mil thickness periodically by taking a coupon sample and caliper measurement.
  7. After sampling 5 quadrants it is at the discretion of the inspector to continue collecting samples every 500 ft2 or 1,000 ft2.
  8. This method will verify the thickness of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE layer prior to it fully curing. Observed shrinkage of the NITRA-CORE layer during the curing process ranges from 5% to 10%. When taking uncured samples assume a minimum of 10% loss for horizontal surfaces and 5% for vertical surfaces. Assuming a 10% loss, the gauge should read a mil thickness between 65 and 70 mils (?66 mils).
  9. If using a wet mil gauge to verify a fully cured membrane the gauge should read 60 mils.
  10. When testing is complete, send a copy of the membrane testing log to Land Science. Keep the coupon samples for the file or send them to Land Science.

Coupon Sampling

Coupon sampling is the most accurate way to verify the NITRA-CORE thickness. However, please note that taking too many coupon samples, or destructive samples, can be counter-productive. To collect a coupon sample the following steps should be followed:

  1. Create a membrane testing log by obtaining a copy of the foundation plan and then draw a 500 square foot grid over the foundation plan. Make two copies of the membrane testing log, one should be used when collecting coupon samples and the other should be used when conducting the smoke test.
  2. Note time, date, project name, inspector name, temperature and weather conditions on testing log.
  3. Number each quadrant and inspect sequentially.
  4. When arriving at each quadrant quickly assess if there are any conditions that might present any challenges in establishing a proper seal. Note areas and discuss with applicator.
  5. Conduct a visual inspection of the membrane. Look for areas where a proper seal was not created, i.e. a fish-mouth at the termination and areas where the membrane might be sprayed thin. Mark areas needed for repair in the field with florescent paint or with chalk. Also make a note on the testing log.
  6. Calibrate mil reading caliper to account for the thickness of the BASE layer. This is best done by obtaining a sample of the BASE layer and then zeroing out the caliper to the BASE layer.
  7. Collect a coupon sample in the area that is suspected to be sprayed thin. Use a box cutter to cut a 3 square inch sample from the membrane. Measure each side to confirm the specified minimum thickness has been obtained. Number each sample and save in the job file. Mark the area for repair in the field and on the site plan.
  8. After sampling 5 quadrants it is at the discretion of the inspector to continue collecting samples every 500 ft2 or 1,000 ft2.
  9. Samples may be collected prior to the NITRA-CORE layer fully curing. Observed shrinkage of the NITRA-CORE layer during the curing process for horizontal surfaces is 10%. Assuming a 10% loss, a minimum of 66 mills thickness should be measured for a cured measurement of 60 mils.
  10. When testing is complete, send a copy of the membrane testing log to Land Science. Keep the coupon samples for the file or send them to Land Science.

Smoke Testing

This test is intended to visually verify and confirm the proper installation of the Land Science’s vapor barrier systems. Land Science requires a smoke test on all projects in order to obtain a warranty. The smoke test will be performed by the applicator.

Smoke testing should occur after the NITRA-CORE layer has been installed and mil thickness verified. Smoke testing may be conducted before the NITRA-CORE is fully cured. Smoke testing may occur after the BOND layer is installed, if preferred by the applicator. Upon completion of the original smoke test, additional smoke tests can be conducted per the membrane manufacturer’s, specifying engineer or regulatory agency’s request. To conduct a smoke test, follow these steps:

  1. One smoke test can cover between 2000-3000 square feet per test. However, coverage will greatly depend on the sub grade under the membrane. On sites where multiple smoke tests will be needed, use the first two smoke tests to estimate the coverage area per test.
  2. Visual verification of soundness of seams, terminations and penetrations should be performed. Identify/correct any apparent deficiencies and/or installation problems.
  3. Note time, date, project name, inspector name, temperature and weather conditions on testing log. In addition, record humidity, barometric pressure, and wind speed/direction. Confirm wind speed is below 15 mph. Visual identification of leaks becomes more difficult with increasing wind speed.
  4. Cap other vent outlet(s) not being used. If the installation has no sub-slab vent system or the membrane is isolated from the vent system, connect the smoke testing system directly to the membrane using a temporary boot collar or other method. Insert the smoke test hose into coupon sampling locations, creating a seal around the smoke test hose with a rag.
  5. Activate the smoke generator/blower system and connect to sub-slab vent riser or directly to the membrane.
  6. To confirm the adequate flow of smoke under the membrane cut a 2″ vent in the membrane to facilitate the purging of air pockets under it. If working properly, smoke will consistently flow though the 2″ vent. If a low rate of smoke flow is observed, it is an indication of poor smoke flow under the membrane. If low flow does occur, insert the smoke testing hose into the 2″ membrane vent.
  7. Mark sampling locations with fluorescent paint or chalk. Repair sampling locations per Land Science recommendations.
  8. Maintain operation of smoke generator/blower system for at least 15 minutes following purging of membrane. Thoroughly inspect entire membrane surface. Use fluorescent paint or chalk to mark/label any leak locations. Mark/label leak locations on testing log. NOTE: The duration of the smoke test will vary depending on the size of the area being tested. To help determine the duration, monitor the pressure building up under the membrane. If excessive lifting of the membrane occurs, decrease the duration or pressure of the smoke test.
  9. Prepare membrane inspection log. Identify the type of leak found, i.e. poor seal around penetration, fish-mouth, puncture, etc.
  10. Repair leak locations marked in step 7 and step 8 per procedures outlined in “Vapor Barrier Repair Procedures” section using the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE or DETAIL. Repairs can be made when the smoke machine is in operation. If the smoke machine is shut down in order to make the necessary repairs, restart the smoke machine to verify the repairs have been made properly.
  11. Repeat steps 4 through 10 as necessary to confirm the integrity of the membrane.
  12. Complete the smoke testing inspection form indicating the successful completion of the smoke test.

Post Installation Inspection

After a Land Science manufacturer’s representative or Land Science certified inspector signs off on the membrane installation and the steel workers begin to install the rebar, it is recommended to conduct a visual inspection prior to the placement of concrete. Damages are most likely to occur during this time and it is imperative that punctures are identified prior to the placement of the slab. The system configuration of the vapor barrier, the BOND layer with a middle black NITRA-CORE layer, will make rebar punctures easy to identify when conducting a visual inspection.

 

Take the quiz here

Thickness readings should be taken every:

  1. 500 ft
  2. 1000 ft2
  3. 500 ft2, but can be changed to every 1000 ft2 if approved by the inspector
  4. None of the above

The vapor barrier NITRA-CORE shrinks as it cures; the expected shrinkage on a horizontal surface is:

  1. 12%
  2. 10%
  3. 8%
  4. 6%

To achieve a 60 mil thick NITRA-CORE layer, the yield for a 55 gal drum is:

  1. 480 ft2
  2. 525 ft2
  3. 935 ft2
  4. 4,675 ft2

To conduct a smoke test, place the smoke test hose:

  1. on to a vent riser
  2. under the membrane by cutting a slice in the membrane and then inserting the hose
  3. in between the NITRA-CORE layer and the BOND layer
  4. A and B only

To verify the mil thickness of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE layer, trust the following:

  1. Tactile measurements
  2. Visual verification
  3. Caliper testing
  4. Smoke testing

If using a wet mil gauge to verify the NITRA-CORE mil thickness, it is necessary to also take a coupon sample measured by a caliper in order to verify the measurement of the wet mil gauge.

  1. True
  2. False

Appendix B

Vapor Barrier Repair Procedures

The repair procedures for the vapor barrier membrane vary depending on the type of damage that occurred and at what step during the installation process. Repairs can be made using the vapor barrier’s NITRA-CORE or NITRA-CORE Detail and both options are explained.

In addition to the potential damage caused by construction traffic, repair procedures to the vapor barrier system should conducted at areas where measurement devices that were used to verify thickness of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE membrane damaged the membrane.

Damage to the NITRA-CORE Only

Vapor Barrier NITRA-CORE

Apply the NITRA-CORE asphalt emulsion component to a 9″ area around the damaged NITRA-CORE; allow the asphalt emulsion to flow into the damaged area. Apply the catalyst to set the NITRA-CORE in place. It might be necessary to repeat this process if the damage is severe.

Vapor Barrier NITRA-CORE Detail

Apply a tack coat of NITRA-CORE Detail to a 9″ area around the damaged NITRA-CORE. Apply two additional 40 mil coats of NITRA-CORE Detail over the tack coat. The first coat should be dry to touch prior to the application of the second coat.

Damage through the Entire Vapor Barrier System

Vapor Barrier NITRA-CORE

Apply a vapor barrier NITRA-CORE tack coat 9″ around the damaged area. Cut a square piece of vapor barrier BASE that extends 6″ beyond the damaged area and place BASE (fabric side down) into the tack coat of NITRA-CORE by pressing firmly. Apply a 60 mil NITRA-CORE layer to the BASE, thus encapsulating the BASE layer. Cut a square piece of BOND (fabric side up) that will extend 3″ beyond the NITRA-CORE layer. Place the BOND over the NITRA-CORE layer. Apply a 30-mil coat of NITRA-CORE to the BOND layer edges to secure and seal the BOND layer in place.

Vapor Barrier NITRA-CORE Detail

Treat the area 9″ around the damaged area with a coat of the vapor barrier’s NITRA-CORE Detail. Cut a square piece of the vapor barrier’s BASE that extends 6″ beyond the damaged area and place the BASE (fabric side down) into the base coat of the vapor barrier’s NITRA-CORE Detail by pressing firmly. Apply two coats (40 mil each) of NITRA-CORE Detail over the BASE layer, thus encapsulating the BASE layer. Cut a square piece of BOND (fabric side up) that will extend 3″ beyond the NITRA-CORE layer. Apply a 30-mil coat of NITRA-CORE Detail to the BOND layer edges to secure and seal the BOND layer in place.

Damage to the Vapor Barrier NITRA-CORE and Vapor Barrier BOND

Vapor Barrier NITRA-CORE

Apply 60-mil coat of NITRA-CORE to the damaged BOND layer and 4″ beyond the damaged area. Cut a square piece of BOND (fabric side up) and extended 3″ beyond the damaged area. Apply a 30-mil coat of NITRA-CORE to the BOND layer edges to secure and seal the BOND layer in place.

Vapor Barrier NITRA-CORE Detail

Apply two coats (40 mil each) of NITRA-CORE Detail to the damaged BOND layer and 4″ beyond the damaged area. Cut a square piece of BOND (fabric side up) to extend 3″ beyond the damaged area and place the BOND layer over the NITRA-CORE Detail layer. Apply a 30-mil coat of NITRA-CORE Detail to the BOND layer edges to secure and seal the BOND layer in place.

Damage to the Vapor Barrier BASE

Vapor Barrier NITRA-CORE

Apply a 30-mil tack coat of the NITRA-CORE 9″ from the edge of the damaged BASE layer. Cut a square piece of BASE that extends 6″ beyond the damaged area and place BASE (fabric side down) into the tack coat of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE by pressing firmly. Apply a 30-mil coat of vapor barrier NITRA-CORE to the BASE layer edges to secure and seal the BASE layer in place.

Vapor Barrier NITRA-CORE Detail

Apply a coat of NITRA-CORE Detail 9″ from the edge of the damaged BASE layer. Cut a square piece of BASE that extends 6″ beyond the damaged area and place the vapor barrier BASE (fabric side down) onto the base coat of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE Detail by pressing firmly. Apply a 30 mil coat of NITRA-CORE Detail to the BASE layer edges to secure and seal the BASE layer in place.

Repair to a Fish-Mouth at Termination

A fish-mouth occurs when the vapor barrier system is not properly terminated to the intended surface and thus a void is created that looks like an inverted “U” or “fish-mouth”. To remove, the fish-mouth area should be cut to allow the membrane to lie flat against the termination surface. Apply a 30 mil tack coat of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE or vapor barrier NITRA-CORE Detail to the termination surface and then secure the membrane into the NITRA-CORE or NITRA-CORE Detail by pressing firmly. Finish the repair process based on the material selected.

Vapor Barrier NITRA-CORE

Apply a 60-mil coat of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE 3″ around the fish-mouth area

NITRA-CORE Detail

Apply a 30-mil coat of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE Detail 3″ around the fish-mouth area. When dry to the touch, apply two additional 30 mil coats of the vapor barrier NITRA-CORE Detail.

 

 

Take the quiz here

The simple rule of repairing of the vapor barrier membrane system is to just spray the area with enough vapor barrier NITRA-CORE.

  1. True
  2. False

Coupon Sampling

 

Hint: Answers to the section may also be found in the quality control section of the inspector manual.

 

 

Take the quiz here

As shown in the video, what can lead to incorrect mil thickness readings:

  1. Pressing too hard with the caliper
  2. Not calibrating the measuring device prior to taking the sample
  3. Setting the device to meters
  4. Allowing the sample to move in between the jaws of the caliper
  5. All of the above

When taking a square coupon sample, how many measurements should be taken?

  1. 4
  2. 6
  3. 1
  4. 3

Smoke Testing

 

 

Take the quiz here

In video two, how many areas are in need of repair?

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4

In video one, how long should the smoke test machine run?

  1. The time shown in the video was sufficient to identify areas for repair
  2. Make the repair, then run the test until another stream of smoke appears
  3. All areas being smoke tested need to run the smoke machine for a minimum of 15 min. regardless of size
  4. None of the above

Report Generation

 

Take the quiz here

When filling out a report it is most important to note the following:

  1. A damaged area
  2. The barometric pressure at the time of observation
  3. That the area noted for repair has been repaired
  4. The time

In order for Land Science to issue a warranty, a copy of the inspection report must be submitted to Land Science.

  1. True
  2. False

Client Spotlight: Ron Carroll, Owner and Managing Principal of ATON LLC

Ron CarrollFor Ron Carroll, owner and Managing Principal of ATON LLC, an environmental consulting and engineering firm and valued Land Science® client, choosing a career in environmental remediation was both a personal and professional choice. That’s because when he was younger, Mr. Carroll lived near and had friends who were impacted by the Times Beach dioxin cleanup project in the St. Louis area. As a result of toxic chemicals being mixed with oil and applied to roads for dust control, a massive cleanup was initiated in a small town in St. Louis County. Consequently, the EPA ended up buying many of the homes within the town to facilitate an effective cleanup in the area. Understandably, this environmental hazard and subsequent remediation project left an indelible impression on Mr. Carroll, and he eventually pursued and earned a B.S. in Environmental and Hazardous Materials Management, and a B.A. in Biology, from the University of Findlay. In addition to his university degrees, he also became a Certified Hazardous Materials Manager and Certified Industrial Hygienist. His university studies and professional work experience that followed would eventually culminate in forming ATON, where he oversees the firm’s business activities. He shares, “I’m responsible for managing our environmental, health and safety consulting work, and all administrative operations.  I also conduct and oversee site inspections, multi-media sampling, coordination and negotiation with regulatory agencies, facility decommissioning, demolition, and regulatory reporting.” Prior to forming ATON eight years ago, Mr. Carroll held management positions with a national due diligence and real estate assessment company performing environmental, building sciences, and valuation services; and a national environmental engineering consulting firm that provided site investigation, industrial hygiene, remediation, and regulatory compliance services.

When asked what he likes most about his work, Mr. Carroll points to the benefits that result from consistent teamwork. He continues, “I enjoy interacting on a daily basis with our employees and clients to find sound technical solutions to challenging problems. I also take satisfaction as a mentor to technical staff and as a trusted advisor to our clients in the commercial and industrial sectors.” And the most challenging aspect of his work? “Keeping track of ever-changing regulations and how those regulations affect our business and our clients’ business. While it can be challenging, we feel we’re well-equipped. We’re looking to continue our growth organically by adding key technical staff and expanding geographically. We also see the redevelopment of brownfields as a significant growth area for the company.” When it comes to working with Land Science, Mr. Carroll appreciates the combination of innovative solutions and service ATON receives on a consistent basis. He continues, “Land Science continues to provide a quality product with seamless technical expertise, and this helps in the design and implementation phases of our remedial work. We were recently involved in the relocation and development of a large scale, commercial laundry operation in the St. Louis region that involved the construction of a building over a former chemical plant that is highly regulated by the EPA. The success of the redevelopment using Land Science products led to the continued development of industrial warehouse space near the former plant. In essence, the Land Science solutions form a complete package that typically exceeds our design specifications.”

Residing in St. Louis, with his wife and two children, Mr. Carroll likes to spend his free time with his family, enjoying the outdoors, traveling, and attending various sporting events. “We have a great baseball team, the St. Louis Cardinals,” he says, “and the Stanley Cup hockey champs, the St. Louis Blues.” He also finds time to give back to his community as a volunteer for Habitat for Humanity. To stay abreast of emerging trends and new technologies, ATON offers all its employees continuing education and technical training for environmental, health & safety (EHS) consulting and remediation work. When asked how he he’s seen the industry change, his focus turns to the advancements made possible through innovation. He continues, “We’ve seen technical innovation working its way into what historically has been a labor-intensive industry. In the past we’ve relied on field sample collection and off-site analysis for environmental contaminants. More recently, we’re able to use smaller and lighter field instruments to detect and analyze contaminant concentrations without having to send samples to a laboratory. In addition, innovations in data collection and management have allowed us to compile data and issue reports much quicker, which in turn allows our clients to make more informed and faster decisions on tight timeframes.” Asked what he sees the future holds for environmental remediation, he feels the consulting side of the business will continue to grow. He shares, “We see the traditional EHS consulting field continuing with strong growth. The environmental remediation industry also continues to grow through local, state, and national brownfield development initiatives.” And how would he encourage others to join his field of study? He concludes, “Education and training in STEM are keys to our success and growth. I would encourage others interested in science and the environmental field to become STEM practitioners and supporters as a way to enter this industry.”

Land Science is proud to have Ron Carroll, Managing Principal of ATON, as a valued client and partner in environmental remediation, and appreciates his vast experience and knowledge base in providing successful remediation outcomes for Land Science and its clients.

Nitra-Seal Datasheets

Nitra-Seal Technical Data Sheet

Nitra-Core Technical Data Sheet

Nitra-Base Technical Data Sheet

LandScience Bond Technical Data Sheet

TerraVent Specifications Sheet

Nitra-Seal Construction Details

In an effort to provide the best support possible to environmental consultants, architects, contractors, applicators, and inspectors, Land Science provides a variety of pre-engineered details and information for different vapor intrusion mitigation designs and solutions.

To access and download the DWG file content on this page, you must first fill out our short Registration Form. If you have already registered for an account then go straight to the Login Page.

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Detail Drawing PDF DWG
Nitra-Seal & Terra-Vent Riser PDF-icon dwg-icon
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Nitra-Seal Existing Repair Sequence PDF-icon dwg-icon
Nitra-Seal Penetration Sequence PDF-icon dwg-icon
Nitra-Seal System Components PDF-icon dwg-icon
Nitra-Seal Termination Sequence PDF-icon dwg-icon
Nitra-Seal Vertical Termination PDF-icon dwg-icon

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Detail Drawing PDF DWG
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Nitra-Seal Existing Repair Sequence PDF-icon dwg-icon
Nitra-Seal Penetration Sequence PDF-icon dwg-icon
Nitra-Seal System Components PDF-icon dwg-icon
Nitra-Seal Termination Sequence PDF-icon dwg-icon
Nitra-Seal Vertical Termination PDF-icon dwg-icon

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For more information or to inquire about a unique design, please contact Land Science support at info@landsciencetech.com

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Background

The effectiveness of a vapor intrusion mitigation (VIM) system depends on the quality of its installation. Improper installation can lead to vapors entering occupied spaces, potentially harming human health, and exposing the owners to legal liability. In order to minimize the possibility of system failure, it is highly advisable to hire an applicator who has undergone a rigorous certification process demonstrating they can meet strict manufacturer installation standards. Hiring an applicator who has not been certified can lead to substandard installation, system failure, and increased risk to human health.

Land Science certified applicators have the knowledge to properly install VIM systems, troubleshoot issues as they come up, and avoid problems before they happen. Hiring a Land Science certified applicator to install your VIM system will ensure that the installation will be performed to exacting manufacturer standards, work to protect human health, help owners avoid legal exposure, and save both time and money.

Certified applicator

7 Reasons to Hire a Land Science Certified Applicator